See Also...

If you are interested in birds, you may also like to read what's on our Birds on Magog Down page.

Bird Club - come and join us!

If you have never given birdwatching a try do come along on the first Saturday of the month (meeting in the car park at 8am from April to October; slightly later at 8.30 am from November to March).

Membership is very informal–– just turn up and enjoy the birding walk. It is a healthy way of getting fresh air and exercise, and de-stressing while learning about birds.

We welcome new members of any age from beginners to life-time bird watchers. Sorry, no dogs

skylark_garth_cropped_250Photo: Skylark (Alauda arvensis) © Garth Peacock 2015

The next Bird Club walk will be on Saturday 7th September 2019.

The next meeting is due on Saturday 7th September: meet in the car park at 8am; we walk for about 2 hours. If the forecast is bad, it may be delayed to the following week - follow us on Twitter for the latest updates.  All welcome, sorry no dogs.

Bird reports 2018 next

Report of Stapleford Bird Club - December 2018

The walk was delayed by a week because of rain. Saturday the 8th was a beautifully sunny day but we were fearful that the strong wind would cause some small birds to hunker down, and we were correct.   The car park was not too windswept and we noted two Fieldfares and 9 Redwings (the winter thrushes), one singing Robin and one calling out of sight, and two Jackdaws; and around the bird feeders at the far end there were brightly coloured Blue Tits and Great Tits, Chaffinches, a Dunnock and Blackbird, and a Magpie. A scattering of Black-headed Gulls flew over, on their way to their feeding grounds.  Some rather weak Robin song was heard as we walked by Memorial Wood, and in Magog Wood we heard two more in song, and a small mixed flock of tits including a single Long-tailed Tit. In the distance a Buzzard drifted over the tree line from the Wandlebury direction, its underwings brightly lit in the sunshine. A Herring Gull flew low over Feoffee’s Field but didn’t settle.  A Blackbird was alarm-calling loudly and repeatedly on Little Trees Hill and 30 or so Woodpigeons were perched in the trees, sheltering from the wind.    We saw that the Kestrel nest box was stuffed full of dead leaves; how many squirrels can fit together into the roost?

The sheep have long since gone from the Sheep Paddocks but a mixture of Rooks, Carrion Crows and Jackdaws continue to feed on invertebrates there.  At the end of Villedomer Wood we decided to miss out the longer walk to Vestey Wood and instead turned left and walked across the field to check the wild bird winter food strip at the far end.  The number of Linnets is building up nicely, 42 this time, and a Yellowhammer called from the hedge.  A further 60 corvids was feeding in the fields and a solitary Skylark called and a Meadow Pipit flew into the barley stubble.

Altogether 21 bird species were noted on the Down.  As we walk only once a month and in the early morning inevitably we don’t encounter all the bird activity.  In the days around the date of the walk,  late afternoon has had some interesting numbers of birds – up to 20 Yellowhammers, two Corn Buntings and 5 Meadow Pipits have been seen in the field by the winter food strip, some moving on to roost at Wandlebury, and Redwings and a few Fieldfares are regularly roosting near the car park.

     Mike Foley


December 2018

Long-term Survey of Breeding Birds

In February 2012, Bryan Davies and Robin Cox of Cambridgeshire Bird Club proposed a long term breeding bird survey on Magog Down.

Full reports of the first six years of this survey can be found here:

2017 Report

2016 Report

2015 Report

2014 Report

2013 Report

2012 Report

Birds on Magog Down

We publish the monthly reports of Stapleford Bird club here, plus other occasional bird-related articles; hot links in each report will take you to the RSPB information page for each bird spotted.

The gallery below shows a random selection of the birds that have been seen on Magog Down.

  • Linnet male.jpg
  • Long tailed tit.jpg
  • Green woodpecker.jpg
  • Blackbird.jpg
  • Magpie.jpg
  • Gull.jpg
  • Whitethroat male.jpg
  • Garden Warbler.jpg